Christianity and Modern Science

Science and religion may seem unlikely bedfellows, especially if popular narratives of a conflict between the two are to be believed. In this seminar, we will consider the relationship between various aspects of Christianity and modern science. While there are many ways to handle the (both real and perceived) tension between scientific and theological knowledge, we will take as our point of departure an assumption that contributions from both fields are intellectually valuable. From this lens, we will consider how relatively recent scientific developments such as evolutionary theory, quantum mechanics, and modern cosmology interact with classical Christian doctrines of creation, evil and suffering, divine and human agency, and the future of the cosmos. We will cover a new topic each meeting, basing the discussion on a short selection of readings.

Dates: Mondays on 3/15, 3/29, 4/12, 4/26

Time: 5:30-6:45pm PST

Location: Zoom

Discussion Schedule:

 

 

Week 1: Science and Religion

  • Joshua M. Moritz, “The Boundaries and Limits of Science and Faith,” in Science and Religion: Beyond Warfare and Toward Understanding (Anselm Academic: Winona, 2016), 58-81
  • Nathan J. Hallanger, “Ian G. Barbour,” in The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity (Wiley-Blackwell: West Sussex, 2012), 602-606. NOTE: This is not the whole chapter, just the sections on critical realism and Barbour’s typology.
  • Optional: Mikael Stenmark, “How to Relate Christian Faith and Science,” in The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity (Wiley-Blackwell: West Sussex, 2012), 63-73

Week 2: Quantum Mechanics and Agency

Week 3: Creation, Evolution, and the Imago Dei

  • TBA

Week 4: Modern Cosmology and Eschatology

  • TBA 

**This seminar is free and is open to all full-time college students and recent graduates.

Karl van Bibber
Professor of Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley

 

 

 

 

Elliot Rossomme
Doctoral candidate in Physical Chemistry at UC Berkeley